Making Connections to Build Positive Change

Impact Report 2018-19

At the heart of Fred Victor is the idea that we are stronger together

Homelessness is a complex problem with many contributing factors. In our solutions, we rely on a broad network of support to create a foundation for change. Reflecting on the past year, and the 12,000+ people we’ve helped, it is through the connections we’ve made that we can continue to have a positive impact in our city.

There are over 9,200 people who are homeless in Toronto. Approximately 20% have their children with them. More than 2,400 shelter beds have been added in the last two years, and still, the system continues to run at full capacity.

Last year, Fred Victor focused on connecting people to safe and stable places to live.

497 people were housed by Fred Victor last year
90% of residents in our Women’s Transitional Housing are moving on to permanent housing within a year
97.5% of our Housing Access and Support Services clients have retained their housing in the last 24 months

1 in 5 Torontonians live in poverty. The cost of living keeps rising, and yet, good jobs are hard to find. Almost half of the people working in the Greater Toronto Area have temporary, contract, or part-time jobs that lack stability and offer no benefits.

Last year, Fred Victor provided training and services to connect people to meaningful work.

143 people found jobs after working with our Employment and Training Services
3800+ times people accessed our Employment and Training Services
85% of Women’s Bakery graduates have secured employment or are pursuing further education

In 2017, there were 100 homeless deaths in Toronto – with the leading known causes being drug overdoses, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Up to 35% of people experiencing homelessness have a mental illness, and about 1 in 4 suffer from concurrent disorders (mental illness and substance use).

Last year, Fred Victor connected people to resources that improved their health and well-being.

8,300+ visits to our Safe Consumption Site and over 130 overdoses reversed
1,215 people received Mental Health Case Management support
47,671 people received information and referrals at our 145 Queen Street site

There are over 9,200 people who are homeless in Toronto. Approximately 20% have their children with them. More than 2,400 shelter beds have been added in the last two years, and still, the system continues to run at full capacity.

Last year, Fred Victor focused on connecting people to safe and stable places to live.

  • 497 people were housed by Fred Victor last year
  • 90% of residents in our Women’s Transitional Housing are moving on to permanent housing within a year
  • 97.5% of our Housing Access and Support Services clients have retained their housing in the last 24 months

1 in 5 Torontonians live in poverty. The cost of living keeps rising, and yet, good jobs are hard to find. Almost half of the people working in the Greater Toronto Area have temporary, contract, or part-time jobs that lack stability and offer no benefits.

Last year, Fred Victor provided training and services to connect people to meaningful work.

  • 143 people found jobs after working with our Employment and Training Services
  • 3800+ times people accessed our Employment and Training Services
  • 85% of Women’s Bakery graduates have secured employment or are pursuing further education

In 2017, there were 100 homeless deaths in Toronto – with the leading known causes being drug overdoses, cardiovascular disease and cancer. Up to 35% of people experiencing homelessness have a mental illness, and about 1 in 4 suffer from concurrent disorders (mental illness and substance use).

Last year, Fred Victor connected people to resources that improved their health and well-being.

  • 8,300+ visits to our Safe Consumption Site and over 130 overdoses reversed
  • 1,215 people received Mental Health Case Management support
  • 47,671 times people received information & referrals at our 145 Queen Street site

Personal Connections

Shery’s Story

Shery pieced her life back together, and became a whole new person.

Azmara’s Story

By styling new looks, Azmara has her sights set on a bright future.

Mona Lisa’s Story

In a renovated Victorian mansion, the biggest transformation was in Mona Lisa’s life.

Sarah’s Story

It’s a life-saving service that keeps Sarah’s hope alive.

Social Connections

A Message from our CEO and Board Chair

Mark Aston
CEO

Janet Mason
Chair of the Board

Our impact can be measured through our connections.

It could be two people having a conversation at our community drop-in program; or someone learning to write an effective resume with Fred Victor staff; or a private developer reaching out to us because they want to build supportive housing. Through these connections, bridges are built to help people access healthcare, secure decent jobs, and find safe places to call home.

Since December 2017, Fred Victor has worked with the City of Toronto to operate emergency respite services – first at the Better Living Centre, then Lambton Arena, and temporarily in a building at 545 Lake Shore Blvd. The Respite Centre is a low-barrier site where people who are experiencing homelessness can get help. In 2018, respite staff worked to house over 80 people, and have connected nearly 300 people to health and clinical care.

Moving the Respite Centre while continuing operations was an extensive undertaking, and included reaching out to the broader community in each new area. We had to be proactive and open a dialogue with local business owners and residents in order to build support for the services we are providing.

In September 2018, we opened the doors to Mary Sheffield House – a Victorian mansion on Jarvis Street. The property was renovated by owner Mike Ahmadi and his family to convert it into supportive housing for senior women from the shelter system. We welcomed 27 women into Mary Sheffield House – and the beautifully transformed home has inspired incredible transformations among the residents. Nearly half of the women who entered in the fall have moved on to permanent housing.

A similarly successful model is our Women’s Transition to Housing located on Dundas Street East. The program aims to quickly re-house women who are experiencing homelessness, and prevent them from becoming chronic shelter users. In the past year, we have seen 90% of the residents move on to permanent housing within a 12- month period.

Fred Victor’s Housing Access and Support Services (HASS) housed 138 people in 2018. The highly responsive team worked creatively to connect people to safe, affordable and sustainable housing. Understanding that many of their clients face barriers even after they find a place to live – largely because of their experience with homelessness, substance use, or interactions with the justice and mental health systems – a major focus for the team is housing retention. As a result of their efforts, 97.5% of clients have retained their housing in the last 24 months.

To support people on a path out of poverty, Fred Victor’s Employment and Training Services saw over 1,000 clients last year. The dedicated team works one-on-one with people to help them develop new skills, connect to education programs, and achieve their employment goals. Last year, 143 people were able to secure jobs after joining the program.

The Women’s Bakery was instrumental in helping women find meaningful employment despite obstacles such as a lack of experience, low education levels, and English as a second language. The program had 18 graduates in 2018, and each of them gained practical and transferable skills, as well as hands-on experience with professional bakers and facilitators. Many of the participants are now working permanent, full-time jobs in the baking industry.

In February 2018, when Fred Victor introduced its Safe Injection Site at 145 Queen Street East, we knew it would save lives. During the subsequent 12 months, the service has had over 8,300 visits and staff have reversed over 130 overdoses. Fred Victor’s work on the frontlines of the opioid crisis includes the collection of client feedback and responses to neighbourhood concerns – all measures to ensure that this vital service can continue to be safe, secure and lead to healthy outcomes in the community.

Over the course of the last year, Fred Victor served 74,953 meals to the community. Not only did this help to address food insecurity among people who are experiencing homelessness – these meals were opportunities for people to sit down with one another and build a sense of community. Our Drop-In programs have been effective in much the same way, fostering a sense of belonging among participants and counteracting the social isolation that often besets people living in extreme poverty.

All of Fred Victor’s programs and services have had a positive impact, reaching many different communities across the city.

Ultimately, we hope that when you read this report and the stories we’ve shared about our community, it illustrates how each connection made at Fred Victor brings us closer to ending homelessness. Change is truly possible when you encourage positive connections between people.

Our staff, volunteers, donors, funders and community supporters are a crucial part of this solution. Working together, we can end homelessness.

Thank you.

Photo of Mark Aston

Mark Aston
CEO

Photo of Janet Mason

Janet Mason
Chair of the Board

Our 2018/19 Donors

Thank you for supporting the life-changing connections that Fred Victor has been able make this past year. Together, we can end homelessness in Toronto.

Financials

At Fred Victor, we are committed to transparency and accountability. We take pride in responsibly managing every dollar we receive.

Revenue

$34,431,457

Expenses

$33,991,385